This blog is a first-hand look into the struggles and success of starting and running a business from the bottom.  Starting from the bottom is a reality most of us can relate to.  Starting a business is no different unless you have the capital to give you some leverage.  There are many emotions and hardships that you have to deal with on your journey.  It’s an emotional rollercoaster that will push you to your limits.  The good times don’t last as long as the hard times, but the hard times are what makes you or breaks you.  Tough times don’t last, but tough people do (something like that lol).

Para Hita, LLC started from a simple idea of bringing a taste of Guam to the culinary forefront.  I had no idea how to run a business and my main goal was to own a food truck and work for myself. 

Para Hita, LLC started from a simple idea of bringing a taste of Guam to the culinary forefront.  I had no idea how to run a business and my main goal was to own a food truck and work for myself.  As I started doing more research and getting familiar with the business arena, I realized I had to be well-rounded with the business side of operations, however, the most critical aspect to succeed was to have the best Guam cuisine in the DC area.  I knew I can cook good food, but I didn’t want to settle with just being good, so I went to culinary school to learn the right way to cook.  You may be a good home cook, but being a home cook in a restaurant scenario or when you have a line of paying customers is a totally different beast.  You will get crushed!

Culinary school was the best decision and investment I made.  I learned how to cook the right way and learned how to elevate my craft on a higher level.  Unfortunately, my first roadblock came quick as my culinary school shut down as I was 2 months into my externship and I had to figure what to do next.  I knew I had what it takes to run my own food truck, but I had to prove my concept first.

The first step was getting into a farmers market and that was no easy task.  I was turned away from all the big farmers’ market as most of them wanted established vendors.  I was learning on the fly and just winging it.  I was not deterred from being turned down as I knew in the back of my mind that I just needed the right platform and I will rise to the occasion.

I finally got into a small farmers market and was hit with new challenges from the get-go.  Another lesson learned here and another lesson learned there!  I was putting out fires left to right before I even started!  I became fluent in firefighting (more to come on firefighting)!   I did my homework on the demographics of the farmers market.  I knew it was going to be a challenge, but this was the only opportunity to prove my concept.  The risks definitely outweigh the benefits.  So I didn’t do what any smart businessman would do in this case, I accepted the offer and dove into first base like a rookie!

Stay tune for part 2 as I give you an insight into how my simple vision of owning a food truck morphed into producing an entire retail line of Guam products and how my early lessons learned turned into motivation for my next business moves.